Sunday, March 15, 2015

Dog Fencing

***The following is a sponsored post. I was compensated for the use of my blog but my statements and opinions are my own. Also, the photos are my own and of my wonderful dogs!***


When you move out on land there is one major universal need and that need is fencing. Fencing is also a huge expense. Around here we put up a new section of field fencing every year, when the budget allows.
Thankfully cattle can be contained within moveable electric wire. Dogs are an entirely different issue. When we lived in a subdivision we had an underground electric fence system for our dog. We only had one dog at the time and the fence worked great.
Now we have several dogs who act as yard and livestock protectors, but Duke has been known to wander off at times. There have been many times I considered an electric containment for him but I never knew if one existed.
Today I have a sponsored post that is all about dog fencing systems, including one that has a coverage range of up to 100 acres! I would LOVE to know if anyone has used a system such as this on their property.
**Leave a comment or share this post on Facebook or other social media. If you share the post, let me know in the comments. There will be a drawing Friday, March 20th for a winner amongst the comments and sharing. An Amazon Gift Card for $50 is the prize! Who wouldn't love that? If you are like me, you have a list of books on your Amazon Wish List.**





The Pros and Cons of an Invisible Dog Fence for Your Farm

There are many uses for invisible dog fences on farms. You can use an electric fence to keep
your dogs away from your crops and out of your garden or flower beds. You can stop your dogs
from disrupting or hunting your chickens around their coop. You can prevent your dogs from
entering the barn, bothering other livestock, or falling into a pond or well. Why would you choose
an invisible fence over a more traditional fence, such as wood, PVC, or chain-link? There are
several advantages to invisible fences, so let’s take a closer look at them, along with the
potential disadvantages of the system. Alternatively you can use versafence  if you are
struggling with critters such as raccoons, bunnies and other pest trying to attack your vegetable
garden.

Pros

Large Capacity

Invisible dog fences have a greater capacity than most people realize. Some underground dog
fence systems can enclose up to 100 acres of land. There are also wireless dog fences that can
enclose up to 25 acres of land. The cost of a traditional fence rises dramatically with each
additional acre needed, but the cost of additional wire for an invisible fence system is minimal. If
you want to allow your dogs the run of your entire large acreage farm, a single invisible fence
system is still a viable option.

No Obstruction

One of the biggest advantages of an underground dog fence is that it doesn’t obstruct the path
for anyone besides the dogs wearing the e-collars. When you’re frequently moving about your
farm, especially when you’re carrying supplies, it can be a hassle to open and close a gate. With
an electric dog fence, you can effortlessly cross your dogs’ boundaries to get to where you need
to go. An electronic dog fence will not obstruct the view either, so your ability to see beyond
your dogs’ area to the rest of the land will not be impaired.

Reliable Protection

Traditional fences are exposed to the elements, making them vulnerable to environmental
damage. With lots of acres on a farm, it’s inconvenient to examine the entire length of your
fence after every storm. It’s necessary, however, or else your dogs’ could escape unnoticed. An
underground dog fence offers reliable protection. Damage is rare, but if it does occur, the main
system will notify you immediately of a break in the wire. Determined and stubborn dogs are
also better contained by an electronic dog fence, because they’re unable to dig under, jump
over, or push through like they might with a traditional fence.

Custom Zones

The size and rigidness of traditional fences make them difficult to install in unusual formations or
spaces. An electric dog fence allows you to fully customize the shape and location of your dogs’
designated zone. A wireless dog fence can also offer radial protection. Electric dog fences can
also be repositioned as necessary. If your farm is busy and your space is already limited, an
invisible dog fence will help you maximize your dogs’ play area from the space you do have.

Inexpensive

One of the most attractive aspects of an electric dog fence is that it’s so inexpensive. If you set
up your own invisible fence, you’ll save hundreds, if not thousands, of dollars on installation.
Especially with multiple acres, traditional fences can cost thousands of dollars, but an electric
dog fence can cost as little as $300 total. It’s comforting to know that your dogs’ safety won’t be
compromised due to a modest budget, as the invisible fence cost is so low. A DIY invisible
fence is a project anyone can tackle in just a weekend’s time, and your familiarity with the
system will allow you to fix any future problems (rare that they are) without needing to pay for
service

Cons

One-Way Containment

While the unobtrusiveness of an electric dog fence is nice, this also means it does not function
as a catch-all fence. Other animals on your farm will be able to freely cross over the boundary
wire and enter the dogs’ area. If wild animals are a concern for you, then an electric fence will
not hinder their access to your land. If you need to keep livestock or children inside the yard, or
other animals out, an underground dog fence may not be sufficient. However, traditional fences
and invisible fences can be used together for maximum protection.

Training Required

Placing a traditional fence does not require any training, but an electric dog fence has a bit of a
learning curve. Your dogs will have to learn where their boundaries are located. E-collar training
will take about 15-30 minutes each day for two weeks, and you must be consistent and
thorough. After training, your dogs will not feel the mild corrective shock of the e-collar unless
they deliberately disobey the warning vibrations and cross their boundaries. If you don’t have
the time or desire to train your dogs this way, then the system won’t work for you.

Power Source Needed

An electric fence requires a power source, which may limit your placement possibilities.
However, solar panels can be purchased for about $100 in order to power your fence if it’s not
located near an outlet, and that’s still cheaper than a traditional fence. If your electricity goes
out, your fence won’t work without a backup power source, so this is a consideration also. Many
fences have backup batteries to combat this problem, but not all.
When it comes time to choose and install your electric dog fence, online reviews and
manufacturer instructions will be invaluable resources. The type of dogs you have and the size
of your farm should direct your choice. As long as your dogs aren’t younger than six months,
pregnant, or infirm, they can be trained on an electric dog fence, and the vast majority of
invisible fence users are extremely happy with their reliability and versatility. After all, the safety
of your dogs on the farm is of the utmost importance.

Published in partnership with www.dogfencediy.com. We encourage you to share your
experiences with a variety of dog containment systems in the comments section. Commenters
and those who share the post in social media qualify for a drawing of a $50 Amazon gift card!


************* This contest is closed. Thank you to everyone who participated!**************

23 comments:

  1. Karin Licht GilstrapMarch 15, 2015 at 6:48 AM

    living in a townhouse, I really don't have the option to use any type of fence with my two dogs....but if they would allow it, I would love to fence in my front yard so my dog could go out on their own and enjoy some sunshine instead of being on a leash.

    ReplyDelete
  2. We've never used that type of fencing, but I used to have neighbors who did and it worked very well!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I would love to try one that expanded around all of my property. My Duke tends to wander

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  3. No dogs here. My sister has a sheep farm, so I should ask her what she does for her Pyrenees.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. What kind of sheep? I do love sheep:-)

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    2. Katahdins. She's in the middle of lambing right now, and has had two sets of triplets this week, in addition to all the twins.

      Delete
    3. I love lambing, especially when the mama ewes are good mothers! On another note....YOU WON THE GIFT CARD! I need your email address so email me! mybarefootfarm@catt.com Congratulations! :-)

      Delete
  4. We have 2 large dogs and have had great success with our invisible fence. The dogs were easily trained to it, and it gives me peace of mind that they won't get close to the road, or get too excited by a squirrel or coyote and take off too far into the woods. We used an invisible fence for years with other family dogs and it's been nearly the perfect solution for us. The only issue we've had is that the dogs seem to have an uncanny knack for knowing if there's a power outage, and they can't resist making a break for it. .

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. My farm animals are good at figuring out when an electric fence isn't plugged in too:-)

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  5. We have had a HUGE problem keeping our Pyrs in. They can literally WALK over our 5 foot goat fence. It is insane. Dr. Benson recommended the underground fence to me (Petsafe, I think). I LOVE IT. We have had so few problems and unless the power goes out or a chipmunk cuts our line...the Pyrs stay in. Anna Maynard

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    Replies
    1. My electric pig fence works really well too...except when it comes unplugged:-) I don't check it as often as I should!

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  6. I don't have dogs, just here for the gift card hahaha... and I always love reading your blog no matter the subject!!

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  7. And I shared on my facebook profile and tagged my SIL who has a somewhat-reformed fence-escape artist of a dog ;)

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    Replies
    1. I own a couple of dogs like that too:-)

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  8. I originally found your blog while I was researching cotswold sheep and stuck around because I enjoy reading about the things you and your family get into. Keep up the good work!

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    Replies
    1. I just browsed your blog! the 7000 mile trip? How awesome!!!

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  9. I'm thinking an invisible fence is what we need for our lab!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, labs are known for exploring:-)

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  10. It's past the deadline for the drawing, but, for whatever it's worth, here are my two cents. :)

    Not to say that it won't in the future, but electric fencing has never worked for us. Our first lab was a goofy dog and could care less about being shocked. He still came and went as he pleased, and never once flinched when he got zapped. Even after we turned the juice up all the way AND crossed the wires to make the shock even stronger. He was a strange pup.

    It didn't work for our other two labs either, but they were older when we tried to train them. In fact, it scared our chocolate lab so much, he refused to leave the house and started peeing on our back porch. It took me a few months (literally) to retrain him and show him that is was okay to leave the back porch and go back out into the yard and woods. Once he realized it was okay, though, he started running again. Sometimes we'd get calls from people over five miles away telling us our dog was running down the road. In the end, we finally learned what would keep him from running: shooting off the shot gun (NOT towards him). As soon as he would hear the gun, he'd run straight back and inside the house lickety split! Problem solved.

    And there you have it. :)

    ReplyDelete
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    ReplyDelete
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    ReplyDelete

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